How to Export Chrome Pass­words to CSV in Desk­top, Mobile, and Web

Switching from Google Chrome's built-in password manager to a dedicated service such as LastPass, 1Password, or Dashlane should be painless. But not all services or circumstances permit you to import your data directly from Chrome. So you must export your Chrome passwords to a CSV file before you can add them to the service of your choice.

Export Chrome Passwords to CSV Featured

Chrome thankfully sports the ability to export your passwords into the CSV file format. Not only can you do that on desktop, but you can grab a CSV copy on the mobile versions (Android and iOS) of Chrome as well. And if you've used Chrome Sync to back up and sync your passwords, you can also use Google's Password Manager web portal (via any web browser) to download them in the CSV format.

Let's go through all the ways you can use to extract your login credentials to the CSV file format below. We shall start with the desktop version of Chrome for PC and Mac.

Warning: Anyone can easily read passwords from a CSV file. Remember to delete it once you've imported the data to another password management tool or service.

Export Chrome Passwords to CSV on Desktop

If you use Chrome on a PC or Mac, you can quickly grab a copy of all saved login credentials by diving into the browser's integrated Passwords management screen. The following steps should show you how.

Step 1: Click your profile icon to the upper-right corner of the Chrome window. On the profile flyout, click the Passwords icon.

Export Chrome Passwords to CSV 1

Step 2: On the Passwords management screen that shows up, click the icon with three dots next to Saved Passwords.

Export Chrome Passwords to CSV 2

Step 3: Click Export Passwords.

Export Chrome Passwords to CSV 3

Step 4: Click Export Passwords to confirm that you want to save your passwords in the CSV format.

Export Chrome Passwords to CSV 4

Step 5: Specify a destination to save the CSV file, and then click Save.

Export Chrome Passwords to CSV 5

You can now access the CSV file by navigating to the saved location using File Explorer (PC) or Finder (Mac).

Export Chrome Passwords to CSV on Mobile

Like on desktop, you can easily convert your login credentials into a CSV file via Chrome's integrated Passwords management screen. Since the user interface differs between Chrome for Android and iOS, the following breakdown should walk you through the process of exporting passwords to the CSV format in both versions.

Google Chrome - Android

Step 1: Open the Chrome menu, and then tap Settings.

Export Chrome Passwords to CSV 6
Export Chrome Passwords to CSV 7

Step 2: Tap the option labeled Passwords. On the Passwords management screen that shows up, tap the three-dot icon to the upper-right corner of the screen.

Export Chrome Passwords to CSV 8
Export Chrome Passwords to CSV 9

Step 3: Tap Export Passwords—you may have to authenticate your action (by inserting your device passcode, for example). When asked for confirmation, tap Export Passwords.

Export Chrome Passwords to CSV 10
Export Chrome Passwords to CSV 11

Then, you can choose to either save the CSV file to local storage or share it with an app of your choice.

Google Chrome - iOS

Step 1: Open the Chrome menu, and then tap Settings.

Export Chrome Passwords to CSV 12
Export Chrome Passwords to CSV 13

Step 2: Tap Passwords. On the Passwords management screen that shows up, scroll down to the bottom of your list of passwords.

Export Chrome Passwords to CSV 14
Export Chrome Passwords to CSV 15

Step 3: Tap Export Passwords, and then go through the required form of authentication (Touch ID or Face ID). Tap Export Passwords again when prompted.

Export Chrome Passwords to CSV 16
Export Chrome Passwords to CSV 17

You can then save the generated CSV to any location within the iPhone/iPad Files app (tap Save to Files), or share it with another app on the Share Sheet.

Export Chrome Passwords to CSV on Web

If you use Chrome Sync, your passwords should automatically get saved to your Google Account. That means you can sign into any browser (not just Chrome) with your Google Account credentials and download your passwords directly from the Google servers.

Note: If you use a Sync Passphrase to secure your Chrome data, you can't access nor download your passwords directly from your Google Account.

Step 1: Visit the online Password Manager at passwords.google.com using any web browser (Chrome, Firefox, Microsoft Edge, etc.). Sign in with your Google Account credentials when prompted.

Step 2: Click the cog-shaped Settings icon to the upper-right corner of the Password Manager.

Export Chrome Passwords to CSV 18

Step 3: Click Export.

Export Chrome Passwords to CSV 19

Step 4: Click Export when asked for confirmation.

Export Chrome Passwords to CSV 20

Step 5: Authenticate your action with your Google Account credentials.

Export Chrome Passwords to CSV 21

Step 6: Your passwords should then download as a CSV file.

Export Chrome Passwords to CSV 22

Sign out of your Google Account if required.

Passwords Takeout

Unlike importing passwords from a CSV file into Chrome, the process of exporting them is incredibly easy. However, you must protect the CSV file since it contains passwords to nearly every login portal that you've ever signed into. Don't forget to permanently delete the CSV file as soon as possible once you are done importing its data elsewhere. Or if you intend to keep it for safekeeping, make sure to store it in a secure location.

Next up: Running into issues while saving or retrieving passwords in Google Chrome? Here's how to fix it.


The above article may contain affiliate links which help support Guiding Tech. However, it does not affect our editorial integrity. The content remains unbiased and authentic.

Read Next
6 Tested Ways to Fix Chrome Password Manager Not Working Issues
Also See
#passwords #security

Join the newsletter

Dilum Senevirathne is a freelance tech writer who specializes in topics related to Apple hardware and software, Microsoft Windows, and Google web apps. Besides Guiding Tech, he also contributes to technology publications such as iPhone Hacks, Online Tech Tips, Help Desk Geek, and Switching to Mac.