Telecom Operators Will be Fined Rs 5 Lakh for Call Drops: TRAI

Prayank

The Telecom Regulatory Authority of India (TRAI) announced on Friday that telecom operators in India will face stricter rules over call drops and if they don’t meet the norms they will be fined at least Rs 5 lakh.

The Indian telecom authority has set up drop call rates (DCR) benchmarks for telecom operators and the fines for not meeting those benchmarks will lead to fine starting at Rs 5 lakh which can go higher ‘depending upon the extent of deviation of performance from the benchmark’.

“Graded financial disincentives in case service providers fail to meet the DCR (drop all rates) benchmarks have been introduced, in which amount payable may depend upon the extent of deviation from the benchmarks,” TRAI said.

The new regulations related to ‘Quality of Services’ would be effective from October 1.

“In case of consecutive contravention of the benchmarks for two-quarters, financial disincentive may be up to one and half times and in case of consecutive contravention of the benchmark for more than two quarters, it may be twice the amount,” said the regulator.

At present, TRAI’s assessment of call drops rely on the evaluation of network performance over the entire service area, averaged every month.

But this methodology wasn’t accurate as averaging resulted in poorly performing cells remaining hidden.

“As a result, while service providers were meeting the benchmarks, customers were complaining about the poor quality of service.”

Now TRAI will be revising the methodology which will now be done on a percentile basis.

It will remove the anomaly which was getting introduced due to averaging of DCR of bad performing cells in the network with good or excellent performing cells,” TRAI added.

(With inputs from IANS)

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Prayank

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Prayank

Bike enthusiast, traveller, ManUtd follower, army brat, word-smith; Delhi University, Asian College of Journalism, Cardiff University alumnus; a journalist breathing tech these days.